King Arthur Wells
King Arthur & The Isle of  Avalon
(Legend)
 
 
Who has not heard of and wondered at the fabulous legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. There are many differing versions of the King Arthur story and a number of British towns and counties count him as their own!
 
However all versions of the legend agree that Arthur was a wise and powerful King who was supported by Merlin, the magician.  He unified the knights of the kingdom and fought against the invading Saxons, halting their advance across England. This was, then, the eternal fight of good against evil.
 
Arthur was said to have been the son of Uther Pendragon and on his father’s death and with the help of Merlin, succeeded him as King.
 
After the Saxons were repulsed, King Arthur was said to have brought peace to the land and with his Knights of the Round Table, settled at the legendry Camelot.  Camelot is thought to have been located at the hill fort of Cadbury Castle, just off the A303 between Sparkford and South Cadbury. The summit of the hill is about 500 feet above sea level. From the top there is an excellent view of the Somerset Levels including Glastonbury Tor.
 
Arthur married the beautiful, but some say, unfaithful Guinevere.  There are intriguing questions as to Guinevere. The Isle of Avalon tradition is that she was buried beside Arthur when his remains were said to be found by Glastonbury monks at Glastonbury Abbey in 1191. However, there is a further tradition that she was taken prisoner by Mordred’s followers and died at Barry Hill and is buried at Meigle in Scotland, about 10 miles (16 Klms) north west of Dundee.
 
After various battles, the legend has it that Arthur was mortally wounded in a fight with his nephew Mordred. King Arthur was then transported by the Lady of the Lake’s maidens to the Isle of Avalon. Glastonbury was said to be an island in the remains of an inland sea. In the middle of the island was Glastonbury Tor (hill) rising 500 feet (153 metres) above sea level. The Tor is riddled with caves and tunnels, and the legend is that they are the entry to the Underworld.
 
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There are many web sites devoted to the King Arthur Legends. A couple are:
Website   King Arthur & Kinghts of the Round Table    External Link
Website   King Arthur - Wikipedia    External Link
 
Decide for yourself how much of the King Arthur legend you wish to believe.