NewportCardiff
Monmouthshire NP20
 
 
 
Newport is a cathedral and university city, and a unitary authority area in south east Wales. It is located on the River Usk close to its confluence with the Severn Estuary, approximately 12 miles (19 km) northeast of Cardiff.
 
Newport has physically expanded so much in recent times that visitors could be forgiven for thinking it is all part of Cardiff but it is actually a separate entity and is the third largest city in Wales and the largest urban area within the historic county boundaries of Monmouthshire
 
History
Once an important river access point for the Roman town of Caerleon, the settlement had to reinvent itself after the Romans left. It became a port in medieval times when the Normans built a castle there. It grew significantly in the 19th century, when its port became the focus of coal exports from the eastern valleys of South Wales. Until the rise of Cardiff from the 1850s, Newport was Wales' largest coal-exporting port.
 
During the 20th century, when the docks declined in importance, Newport remained an important manufacturing and engineering centre. It is still a thriving city with all the amenities of other metropolises, such as museums, galleries, performing arts centres, parks and gardens, and some unusual landmarks such as the Newport Transporter Bridge and the extensive Roman remains of Caerleon and Caerwent.
 
Getting There
Newport is located 138 miles (222 km) west of London and 12 miles (19 km) east of Cardiff and has excellent road and rail links to the rest of the UK. Newport is well linked with nearby Cardiff, with approximately six rail and five bus services between the cities every hour.
 
The M4 motorway comes within a mile (1.6 km) of the city centre, and Newport can be accessed from six junctions (from 24–28 inclusive).
 
The Great Western main railway line also passes through the heart of the city, stopping at Newport railway station.
 
For timetable information and tickets go to Web:   National Rail Enquiries
 
Google Maps - Newport